Locality Developers

Summary

  • Overview
  • Available Solutions
    • Windows
    • Linux
    • Other / Hardware
  • Local Routes
    • Locality Routes
    • Non-Mweb-Peered Routes
    • Maxmind Routes
    • SADC Routes

Traffic Splitting Overview


Traffic splitting involves a method of sharing PPPoE traffic between international and local accounts (generally on the ADSL network), based on the destination IP of each packet. The reason why traffic splitting is so popular in South Africa, is because local access is substantially less expensive than full international access. This means users are able to save a tremendous amount, on a cost basis, when browsing local content.


Why aren't ISPs splitting traffic?

While it could be said that traffic differentiation, or splitting, is the responsibility of local ISPs, they have stated that it is a technologically complex task with regards to billing. Alternative explainations are that local usage, when categorised as international, helps to subsidise the high cost of the international portion, meaning the ISPs generate more income. This is primarily the case with mobile operators.


Available Solutions


A number of free cross-platform, including software & hardware, solutions currently exist (and are community driven) for both Linux and Windows. The Linux variations can be run on CPEs such as the Linksys WRT54* broadband WiFi router.


** Windows

The most convenient software solution that currently exists is an open-source (on request) application called Traffic Splitter. Some great features include; the obligatory splitting of traffic between local & international accounts, including auxilary accounts and account specific routing.

- The original forum topic for the project exists at: MyBroadband.


One of the earlier applications which made traffic splitting available on Windows is Route Sentry, though development on it has ceased for a long period of time now.

- The project page, where the software can be downloaded, exists at: Antibody Software.
- The original forum topic for the project exists at: MyBroadband.
- A setup guide also exists at: WebAfrica Knowledgebase.


Updating Route Sentry Autonymously

One misgiving when using Route Sentry is that no updater was written into the original software, this means the local routes database is only updated on every point release. Information on updating Route Sentry, with an included script, and new local routes databases for gamers playing titles such as Call of Duty, can be found at the Route Sentry page.


** Linux

DD-WRT / OpenWRT

DD-WRT and OpenWRT are firmware updates available for a growing selection of broadband routers.
Both lists of supported devices are available at: DD-WRT Supported Devices & OpenWRT Table of Hardware.

The most commonly used router, running DD-WRT / OpenWRT, is the Linksys WRT54G/GL. These solutions can be considered as being hardware based, as once the script is running, all connections both wired and wireless (into the device) will be split, making them the most ideal for LAN environments.


- The latest DD-WRT script available exists at: MyBroadband.
- The original forum topic for the DD-WRT script exists at: MyBroadband.


- The OpenWRT script exists at: Tumbleweed.


Debian / Ubuntu

It's also possible to dial the PPPoE connections, and perform the splitting, directly from your workstation/server.

- A script, with guide, exists at: Tumbleweed.


Gentoo

- Wiki article exists at: TLUG


** Other / Hardware

Router Non-specific

A telnet based script called Local Router is available with the aim of supporting traffic splitting on almost any router.
- The project site exists at: Local Router.


Mikrotik Routerboard

A recommended hardware solution for Mikrotik RouterOS is available, as a script (.rsc), called Tech Guru's Traffic Splitter. The script can be added via the WinBox Loader GUI which means the setup process is straightforward. The script also automates the route updating process via scheduling.

- A comprehensive forum posting with screenshots exists at Tech Guru's.


- Another unrelated guide exists at: MikroTik.


Telkom Mega100WR2

- A script, with guide, exists at: MyBroadband.


IPCop

- The project page, where the software can be downloaded, exists at: RT.SET.
- The original forum topic for the project exists at: MyBroadband.


Local Routes


Local routes databases are essential to the operation of all traffic splitting solutions, this is the reference by which to distinguish what is local.

Locality Developers maintains local routes databases in CIDR and subnet masked formats:
- CIDR format (most commonly used with DD-WRT)
- Subnetted format (most commonly used with Route Sentry)

There are 19,976,356 addresses across 942 blocks, in this database, as of Monday, 1st July 2013
Please note: updates to the database occur daily.

Non-Mweb-Peered Local Routes

The same as above, although these routes exclude Mweb owned IP ranges for "non-peering" ISP users:
- Non-peered CIDR format (most commonly used with DD-WRT)
- Non-peered Subnetted format (most commonly used with Route Sentry)

There are 16,350,630 addresses across 685 blocks, in this database, as of Monday, 1st July 2013
Please note: updates to the database occur daily.

Maxmind Local Routes

Alternatively, local routes databases, via Maxmind, are also maintained in CIDR and subnet masked formats:
- Maxmind CIDR format (most commonly used with DD-WRT)
- Maxmind Subnetted format (most commonly used with Route Sentry)

There are 24,490,180 addresses across 728 blocks, in this database, as of Monday, 1st July 2013
Please note: updates to the database occur each Wednesday.

SADC Routes

By observation, some neighbouring SADC countries (Botswana, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia and Swaziland, in addition to South Africa) appear to be regarded as being in the local realm according to Internet Solutions (at least). As such, SADC local routes databases are maintained for your convenience, in CIDR and subnet masked formats:
- SADC CIDR format (most commonly used with DD-WRT)
- SADC Subnetted format (most commonly used with Route Sentry)

There are 15,979,169 addresses across 1004 blocks, in this database, as of Friday, 1st January 2010